Alabama Dietetic Association Annual Meeting

Hello friends! As always, Happy National Nutrition Month! Once again, I’ve left our annual Alabama Dietetic Association meeting recharged and excited about learning new ideas and catching up with old colleagues and friends. This was an extra exciting year for me to participate not only as an attendee but also as a speaker in one of the breakout sessions to share the efforts of the Alabama Obesity Task Force that you might remember me mentioning last year.

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I’m excited for my upcoming posts, especially since I’ll be talking in detail about some of the yummy and interesting items I found at the Food and Nutrition Expo geared towards our school nutrition folks. I honestly probably ate my weight in commercially prepared whole grain pizza and pastas. All of the different products out to meet the USDA school nutrition guidelines blew my mind and made me wish we had some of these products when I was in school.

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Another highlight of the meeting was getting to listen to and meet Kathleen Zelman, registered dietitian and Nutrition Director for WebMD. After meeting Ellie Krieger in the fall, I feel like my bucket list of meeting all-star dietitians is slowly but surely getting checked off. I loved Kathleen’s inspiration and reminder that as a dietitian, we live in a world where we are constantly competing with the pretty and famous about nutrition advice. As a registered dietitian, we definitely have to stand our ground as the most qualified in providing nutrition advice. I could go on my personal soap box about this so I am glad that Kathleen reminded both students and seasoned RDs about this.

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Kathleen Zelman, MPH, RD,LD

Last, but not least, our state association was able to celebrate Alabama’s very own, Evelyn Crayton, Ed.D, RD,LD as newly elected president-elect of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Super proud to be a dietitian in Alabama…such an exciting time for our state!

Dr. Evelyn Crayton during the ALDA Business Meeting Luncheon

Dr. Evelyn Crayton during the ALDA Business Meeting Luncheon

Okay folks, I think that’s all I’ve got for now. I’ve got some upcoming posts on some featured products from the Food Expo that I don’t think you want to miss 🙂

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Taking Time with Meals and Snacks

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With the “spring forward” time change upon us, I thought I’d talk a little about timing. For some folks, timing and length of meals and snacks can make a difference in weight gain or weight loss.

Timing Your Meals

When it comes to the timing of our meals and snacks, avoid going longer than 4 hours without eating anything (ideally you want to try to eat about every 2 ½ to 3 hours). If you’re in a meeting or running errands during a meal time, make sure to at least have a snack (trail mix, peanut butter crackers, pretzels, etc.,)  to tie you over until you can get an actual meal. If you’re going out with the girls for dinner or any other meal, try to avoid being ravenously hungry when you get to the restaurant. To do this, have a snack such as a small peanut butter sandwich or an apple about 30 minutes to an hour before going out to eat. This snack will help curb your appetite so that you’re still hungry enough to enjoy your main entrée but you’re not so hungry that you mindlessly eat copious amounts of chips and salsa, bread and butter, or any other pre-entrée items that are usually served at restaurants.

Taking Time with Your Meals

Are you a quick eater?  Hectic schedules and society in general tend to make us eat quickly out of necessity. Unfortunately though, rapid eating leaves little opportunity for our body to provide us the sensation of fullness. It takes about 15-20 minutes for our brain and stomach to communicate that we’ve eaten something and give that full feeling. Often times, we end up eating so quickly, that within the first 5 minutes of eating, we’ve already eaten the volume of food it takes for our stomach to feel full BUT since the brain and stomach haven’t had time to communicate yet, we keep on eating and eating until about 20 minutes later we feel that “overfull” feeling (I call it gross full or that level of fullness that makes us want to unbutton our jeans or take off our Spanx) since our brain and stomach have finally caught up with us.

Slow down your pace of eating so that it takes you at least 15-20 minutes to eat your meal. One way to accomplish this is making sure to put down the fork in between every bite of food. Sometimes we end up eating so quickly and we end up already having the 4th bite of mashed potatoes ready to go on our fork before we’ve even completely swallowed our first initial bite!  Other ways you can slow your pace of eating include taking a sip of water (or other low calorie beverage) in between bites of food or even having conversation in between bites of food. Slowing down your pace of eating not only helps with getting full off of a smaller portion size but also allows you to take time to really enjoy and savor each bite of food.

And…..March is National Nutrition Month! This year’s theme is “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.”  By timing our meals and taking time with our meals, we can really enjoy and savor how delicious and healthy food can be. I’ll be having more upcoming posts about National Nutrition Month, including my upcoming trip for the Alabama Dietetic Association annual meeting so stay tuned!!


I'm Blogging National Nutrition Month


Welcome to A Filipino Foodie!

Many of my personal friends and family know that I’ve wanted to launch my nutrition-related blog for quite some time. For the past few years I’ve enjoyed writing things on my personal blog about life and events, but now I am excitedly launching A Filipino Foodie! I can’t wait to use this blog as a way to share nutrition information on every day healthy eating and delicious recipes from time to time. If there are certain topics you’d like to see on here, please let me know!eat better bama